Tag Archives: US

And for the World Cup . . . QATAR???

And, in 2022, the winner is Qatar!

A World Cup to make HISTORY!!

In 2018, the World Cup will not be held in Spain/Portugal, nor England, nor Netherlands/Belgium.  It will be held in Russia–there we will see, no doubt, all sorts of inspiring video-anecdotes about the country and its people–but, maybe not its government.  (Wonder what they’re thinking in Georgia . . .)

In 2022, the World Cup will not be held in Australia, nor Japan, nor Korea, nor the USA.  It will be held in Qatar (pronounced “cutter”).  Qatar is a US ally, sorta.  Troops go on leave there when they are deployed and get laid-over there during their transports to and from theater.  Most of us don’t know much more other than it’s rolling in oil, so it is a wealthy place, but that’s about it.

So, let me provide you with some random fast-facts about the country that beat the US out for a second go at hosting the World Cup.

Location, location, location!

Qatar–Saudi Arabia’s shoe lace

If you are looking for Qatar, first pull up a map of the Middle East.  Find the “boot” of the Arabian peninsula and look for the shoe lace that’s sticking up into the Persian Gulf in the direction of Iran.  Qatar, all 11,586 sq km–so, for those of you who speak miles, slightly smaller than CONNECTICUT–is the first Middle Eastern country to ever host the World Cup.  According to the “Soccerphile” website, FIFA has ranked Qatar the no. 1 soccer country in the Persian Gulf!  Apparently, they are soccer-crazy and have been playing longer than they have had their independence (from Britain, Sept. 3, 1971).  The national team has succeeded in winning both the Gulf Cup and the Asian Games.  The Asian Games were especially interesting–they hosted and beat Iran in the semi-finals and Iraq in the championship match.  Of course, that very fact highlights some of the unique realities that come with holding a major international tournament in a hot region of the globe, both literally and figuratively.  It raises some interesting questions.  Personally, the one I want to see answered the most is what happens if Iran goes fully nuclear by then?  (The U.S. gets the World Cup if Qatar fails to muster . . . now, where is that Magic 8 Ball hiding these days . . .)

Climate Control

The other major issue with Qatar’s location is the climate in that region.  If the World Cup was played in the winter, Qatar would be your go-to destination, but it is not.  When it is not winter, according to the CIA Factbook, Qatar has “very hot, humid summers”.  The Weather Channel website suffered a brain melt-down the moment I submitted Qatar to its search engine, however, according to the Weather Underground website  (wunderground.com), summer highs average over 100 degrees Fahrenheit.  Not to worry, though, because they are crazy rich and have a great plan to beat the summer heat!  Air conditioned stadiums!!!  I have no idea how!!  But, it is an impressive plan to build the stadiums as carbon-free, solar-powered entities–guess we don’t have those in the US.  They are some pretty sweet looking stadiums…

Kill’em with Kindness

One of the really intriguing features of the Qatari bid was that their stadiums will be built in such a way that they can take down portions and use them somewhere else–specifically targeting developing countries.  So, in this one bid we have (1) the first Middle East country ever to host, and (2) a host country that is looking to share its wealth and further expand the game–a longtime commitment of Mr. Sepp Blatter’s otherwise controversial reign as the head ref at FIFA.

Plus, they want to make it a green party!  How this carbon output is effected by the new public transportation and infrastructure that is going to be added for the event, has yet to be assessed.  I do know you cannot deliver all of the world’s soccer hooligans to stadiums by water taxi.  Speaking of hooligans, Qatar assured the world that there will be places to drink alcohol somewhere in the country–the one that’s the size of Connecticut.  Travel, at least, will be reduced from stadium to stadium–unlike, say in Russia!

Roiling Controversy

 

OMG!! RUSSIA AND QATAR!?!?!

So, the next question on the minds of many for this World Cup bid-showdown is simple: did money exchange hands?  Does this stink of a gas for football scandal?  The world is shocked!  Russia beat England–with David Beckham!!  Ask yourself this: Are you drawn by Beckham or Putin?  Stable democracy and economy or mob-run state?  Just a few things I wonder about.  As far as selecting Qatar over the US (or Australia, for that matter–a country that has hosted several international sporting events, not least the Olympics, has an enviable climate, great infrastructure and was represented by Nicole Kidman!), the climate, the region and the unbuilt infrastructure–although, again, it’s not like their Russian-size–are all major questions that the US did not have to worry about in its bid.  (Oh, and we had Morgan Freeman representing us!)

The Week took a quick look at the controversy, providing a glance at three opinions–two crying foul, one concluding that there was no offsides on the play.  Below, are a couple more opinionated reports or blogs regarding FIFA’s 2012 decision.

While the FIFA bids are on the long side–and, not always in English–they also have shorter ads and summaries of each bid’s main points.  If you would like to see them follow this link: http://www.fifa.com/worldcup/bidders/live/index.html.

THE ANNOUNCEMENT:

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Soccer and World History?

 

Ancient Athenian playing a soccer-like game. (National Museum of Archaeology, Athens, Greece)

 

In preparation for my sports history class next semester at the Community College of Baltimore County, I have been preparing a unit on soccer–the game the world plays . . . even if the U.S. does not.  It is also the sport over which the most ink has been spent.  Because of its penetration into the societies that really play it, it is something that has garnered the attention of political scientists, economists and sociologists, but not so much by historians.

 

The Ball is Round, A Global History of Soccer by David Goldblatt

 

It is with that in mind that I have started to develop the reading list, both my preparatory list and my students’, and have started reading David Goldblatt’s 974-page tome, The Ball is Round, A global history of Soccer.  Goldblatt’s argument is simply that soccer must be part of modern historical writing, “Whether the historians like it or not, football [soccer] cannot be taken out of the history of the modern world and the history of the modern world is unevenly, erratically but indisputably etched into the history of football,” (xvii, Goldblatt).  I have argued that sports and other hobbies and interests open windows onto exquisite views of our human past, but I cannot think of a single modern history that has included soccer.  In my mind, sports potentially provides a spark of interest for people who may not know why they should care about history.  Goldblatt argues that it should be considered not as a gimmick to get attention, but as a genuine contributor to history.  I have thought its value is the connection to the culture.  Goldblatt agrees, but thinks it is still more than that, contributing to the culture’s history.

 

A recent tribute to Kurt Landauer, club president of FC Bayern Munchen until the Nazi regime forced the club to expel its Jewish members--the only club not to do so voluntarily before such laws.

 

I wonder if Goldblatt is to be taken seriously.  Certainly, his latter point about history etching itself on the sport has to be accurate, but on considering whether it is the case that soccer can be included versus must be included . . . I am not yet sure.  I will say this: the Cold War should not be covered without a look at the international competitions as a way to demonstrate the apparent success of two conflicting ways of life–regardless of how accurate that presentation actually was.

 

The Miracle on Ice: The US is victorious over the USSR at the 1980 Lake Placid Winter Olympic Games in New York--incredible win considering the state of the nation and the Cold War

 

Come to think of it,  is it is not easy to think of the Nazi regime’s insistence on the physical prowess of the mythical Aryan race without thinking about the Olympics preceding World War II.  For that matter, I can seldom think of baseball without thinking of Cuban refugees and a certain Venezuelan dictator’s failed attempt to make the Big Leagues (poor Hugo Chavez).  Perhaps Goldblatt really has it right and I have undersold my own attempt to bridge sports and history.  Maybe we as historians do ourselves and our scholarship a real injustice by ignoring sports in the final analysis of [modern] world history.

 

A stamp for the 1936 Olympics in Nazi Germany--an affair that violated virtually all of the idealistic purposes of the Olympic Games, but also frustrated Hitler with the success of American Jesse Owens.

 

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Filed under Experiencing History - Project Based Learning